Monthly Archive for October, 2010

Cold and flu prevention = eczema prevention?

I couldn’t help passing this along.  It shows significant reduction in infection among children who take probiotics (healthy bacteria, higher dose than in yogurt).  I have used probiotics to shorten illness and prevent sore throats from progressing into something else, based on other research, so I’m not surprised by the results.

This placebo-controlled trial showed:

“When families didn’t do anything, most kids developed fever, cough, runny nose, and were treated with antibiotics sometime in the next 6 months. But among those who were given the probiotics, most kids did not get a fever, cough, runny nose or antibiotics over the next 6 months. And if they did get sick, it lasted on average about half as long.”

Read more: http://www.drgreene.com/blog/2010/09/07/probiotics-powerful-prevention#ixzz12MEJ2lG8

Since probiotics used in pregnancy have been shown to reduce eczema rates in infants – and I have my own theories about why that is, consistent with Solveeczema.org – I thought I would pass this information along.  My favorite brand of probiotic for this purpose, even for the grown ups in our house, is Baby’s Jarro-Dophilus from Jarrow, it has been more consistently effective of the ones I have used.  (Must be dissolved into a liquid, do not take straight, it can form very sticky clumps.)

Gold mine for soap

I just found this web site, which (I think) is a marketplace for a lot of vendors to sell their artisinal goods, called Art Fire.  I used search term “soap” and refined it with “unscented” and found pages and pages of handmade soaps.   Not all had ingredients I would recommend, but all of the soaps I looked at listed ingredients.  I saw many that would work for the recommendations on Solveeczema.org, some that wouldn’t.

The role of surfactant in asthma

I’ve gotten much feedback over the years that the changes described in Solveeczema.org do more than help eliminate eczema for certain people, they help reduce or eliminate asthma, even in atopic family members who do not have eczema.  I’m not going to do too much analysis here, I’m going to let this article speak for itself:  The role of surfactant in asthma .  I haven’t yet looked for more recent research, but I feel like I’ve hit a gold mine.

We humans make surfactant essential for the proper function of our airway lining.  What happens when stronger, artificial surfactants are introduced with other inhaled substances, such as dust?

Listen to this:  “…sputum samples from patients with asthma have a low surface activity.”

And, “Interestingly, a washing procedure [of the airways ] with saline … restored surfactant function.”

I’m not drawing conclusions, but this is very, very interesting.

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